When: March 9, 2017, 6 p.m.

Where: Braintree

Directions:

Go to the elevators in the middle of the building between the two security desks, and take them to the 8th floor. If building security asks you where you're going just tell them Braintree. The elevators will let you off right in the Braintree lobby.

Merchandise Mart 222 W Merchandise Mart Plaza 8th Floor Chicago, IL 60654
Go to the elevators in the middle of the building between the two security desks, and take them to the 8th floor. If building security asks you where you're going just tell them Braintree. The elevators will let you off right in the Braintree lobby.

Topics


  • How To Develop and Deploy Faster using Python APIs
    (0:20:00 Minutes)
    By: Paul
    Experience Level: Intermediate
    Building and deploying applications has never been easier, especially with the proliferation of APIs. In this talk, I will share the 4 concepts that will allow Python developers to quickly learn and use any Python-based API. The target audience for this talk are intermediate newbies who have a couple of projects under their belt.
  • Quick prototyping with redis-helper
    (0:30:00 Minutes)
    By: Kenneth Wade
    Experience Level: Novice
    In this talk, I will demonstrate some uses of https://pypi.python.org/pypi/redis-helper and how you can easily store, index, and modify Python dicts in Redis. Some asciinema demos are available at https://asciinema.org/~kenjyco
  • How I Taught My Dog To Text Selfies
    (0:30:00 Minutes)
    By: Greg Baugues
    Experience Level: Novice
    This talk is is for Python developers who would like to get started with hardware hacking but have been too intimidated in the past to do so. Also, it's for people who like dogs and/or selfies. Using a Raspberry Pi, Python, Twilio, and a big red button, I taught my dog to text selfies. In this talk, which features 25 minutes of live coding, we'll build the hardware hack from scratch. Developers will walk away knowing how to use Python to interact with Twilio and the Raspberry Pi's GPIO pins. A video of this hack was featured on Mashable and was watched over 2.5M times.