Thursday, March 21 2013 at 07:00 PM at The Onion

Python Deployments at The Onion (and elsewhere)
(0:30:00 Minutes)
By: Chris Sinchok
Chris will cover various Python deployment strategies and technologies, ranging from the naïve (git pull) to the more robust (fabric, capistrano) to the "Enterprise" (Python native package deployments, etc). In order to illustrate these different strategies and technologies, he will take examples from my past projects, and the constantly-evolving Onion deploy process.
Using PyJnius to talk to Android devices
(0:30:00 Minutes)
By: Matt Dorn
Overview of a library that facilitates communication with Android devices via Python -- depending on interest, could include an overview of other Python/Java libraries and/or other ways to use Python with Android.
128 Python enthusiasts attended this meeting.

Thursday, April 11 2013 at 07:00 PM at Threadless

Concurrency in Python and other Languages
(0:25:00 Minutes)
By: Daniel Griffin
- 1 minute pitch about OpDemand and what we do. - Processing HTTP requests with Twisted. - Dealing with blocking code in Twisted (couchdb-python and pika). - Doing long running work with Celery from Twisted. - Communicating between web workers with ZMQ. - Writing code that can be concurrent.
SXSW Interactive 2013
(0:15:00 Minutes)
By: Adam Forsyth
- Themes - Keynotes - Chicago Tech @ SXSW - Other Highlights - Q&A
Threadless Loves Python
By: Mike Steder
In the last year the Threadless engineering department has almost completely changed from PHP and MySQL to Python and MongoDB. I would like to do a brief overview of how we use Python today which will cover our replatformed website, our API, and our internal message queuing system.
105 Python enthusiasts attended this meeting.

Thursday, May 09 2013 at 07:00 PM at DevMynd

In-project virtualenvs
(0:15:00 Minutes)
By: Christopher Webber
apprenticeship model
(0:05:00 Minutes)
By: JP Bader
Pythonic protégés.
Hy: A Lisp that transforms itself into the ython AST.
(1:30:00 Minutes)
By: Christopher Webber
Who saved The Onion, from being hacked by "Syrian Electronic Army"
(0:05:00 Minutes)
By: Sean Bloomfield
Well, this isn't at all Python related (or even all that technical), but at The Onion, we recently had a little run-in with the "hackers" from the "Syrian Electronic Army", and could talk about some lessons learned from that, if there's any interest.
89 Python enthusiasts attended this meeting.

Thursday, June 13 2013 at 07:00 PM at Open Software Integrators

Ultimate Language Shootout IV: C# is slightly better than you might imagine
(0:05:00 Minutes)
By: Philip Doctor
If you find yourself accidentally writing c#, you can still have some fun.
Ultimate Language Shootout IV: CoffeeScript
(0:05:00 Minutes)
By: Feihong Hsu
A brief introduction to CoffeeScript.
Ultimate Language Shootout IV: Go: come drink the delicious kool-aid
(0:05:00 Minutes)
By: David Sutton
From the makers of the wildly successful Plan 9 operating system and B programming language. Go is google's stab at a systems programming.
Ultimate Language Shootout IV: Haskell or: How a List Comprehension Is Like a Burrito
(0:05:00 Minutes)
By: Greg Kettler
It's a compiled, statically typed, lazy, purely functional programming language. About as far as possible from Python? Not quite. The languages have a lot in common and Python has already borrowed a few tricks from Haskell.
Ultimate Language Shootout IV: QUASI
(0:05:00 Minutes)
By: Randy Baxley
1977 - A language, the description of which was handed to me on about one hundred and fifty mimeographed eight and one half by eleven sheets. Robert Sibley handed it to the class to use as our compiler project.
Ultimate Language Shootout IV: Ruby
(0:05:00 Minutes)
By: Ross Heflin
Ruby, what you need to know
111 Python enthusiasts attended this meeting.

Thursday, July 11 2013 at 07:00 PM at Wargaming West

A SciPy recap: Tracking history and provenance with Sumatra
(0:05:00 Minutes)
By: Sheila Miguez
This lightning talk recaps a [talk on Sumatra](http://pyvideo.org/video/2039/using-sumatra-to-manage-numerical-simulations-sc) from the reproducible science track at SciPy2013.
Asynchronous I/O in Python 3
(0:45:00 Minutes)
By: Feihong Hsu
I'm going to talk about PEP 3156 and go over basic usage of the reference implementation, codenamed Tulip.
ipython / notebook demo
(0:20:00 Minutes)
By: Jason Wirth
ipython was a big focus of Scipy, Fernando gave a keynote, Brian gave a talk, and there was a tutorial. ipython appeals to a broad audience from beginners to advanced users. IDLE is awful and I basically learned Python using iPython. Presenter will touch on the powerful features and extensibility for advanced users.
113 Python enthusiasts attended this meeting.

Thursday, August 01 2013 at 07:00 PM at The University of Chicago (Downtown)

Lightening talks on Summer Fellows for "Data Science for Social Good"
By:
4-6 presentations 5-7 minutes each from the summer fellowship program lead by The University of Chicago on "data science for social good" (ref http://dssg.io) Come hear from the 40 fellows (mostly grad students and some undergrads in CS and stats) from around the country. Most of the work is done in Python and partnering with non profits and government organizations
Cluster Fun
(0:30:00 Minutes)
By: Joseph Curtin
An overview of deploying to a cloud solution while retaining the ability to deploy to a raspberry pi. Automate the instantiation of your cluster no matter the hardware. Utilizing libcloud, we'll talk to AWS and Rackspace. Utilizing Paramiko we'll talk to a Raspberry-Pi, AWS, and Rackspace. - Source code and slides will be available at the start of the presentation. https://github.com/jbcurtin/cedar
93 Python enthusiasts attended this meeting.

Thursday, September 12 2013 at 07:00 PM at Braintree

Post djangocon: An overview of edX
(0:30:00 Minutes)
By: yarko
edx is a major django application serving huge numbers of students for MIT, Harvard, Stanford, Berkely, and more. - A brief history of Computer-Based Instruction (python has a role); - incomplete survey of current open-source CBI; - edX: how's it different / what's it's rough structure, what (besides django/python) is involved; - edX: hacking the platform (django development); - edX: hacking courses; a deployment-level VM, and how to get started there; - finally: future topics: deployment; what this can't do (maybe) and why; - wrapup: call for interest & edx project night(s); I'll try to have some USBs for anyone who want to try one of the edX VMs during the talk
Set it, and forget it! Auto Scale on Rackspace
By: Brian Curtin
Rackspace is rolling out a new service to allow your cloud to scale on its own, called Auto Scale. Built on Monitoring, Auto Scale allows you to grow or shrink your fleet of resources as demand changes. pyrax, a Python package for working with OpenStack-based clouds like Rackspace's, just released Auto Scale and Monitoring support with version 1.5.0. I'll show how you can use pyrax to deploy servers and automatically add or remove them based on their usage.
What's Love Got to do with It? / Love: for techies
(0:15:00 Minutes)
By: yarko
What you think Love is - is (probably) wrong. The correct metaphor / definition for live will make much more sense to the software person. In fact, it will help with team building and design too. Yup. Grab a beer. I'll tell you a story about how this evolved (turing machine example), how and where evolution selected it, and why it works - and how it works for approaching problems (design) too. Then I'll lay out the "api" (functional description). Don't take it too seriously. You couldn't have known. Now you will. Cheers!
129 Python enthusiasts attended this meeting.

Thursday, October 10 2013 at 07:00 PM at Market Bar

Rendering Data with D3
(0:15:00 Minutes)
By: Japhy Bartlett
How to begin rendering data with D3, by way of a simple python web server.
5-Minutes Of Pandas [Lightning Talk]
(0:05:00 Minutes)
By: Jason Wirth
A lighting talk introducing Pandas, a library for data manipulating and overall munging goodness. If you do stuff with data and you don't use Pandas, you're doing it all wrong.
Finite State Machine: fysom
(0:10:00 Minutes)
By: Brian Ray
87 Python enthusiasts attended this meeting.

Thursday, November 14 2013 at 07:00 PM at Spartz

CivicLab and Between the Bars
(0:15:00 Minutes)
By: Benjamin Sugar
In this talk, I will present on a slice of the maker movement called "civic making" and a new space that has opened up in Chicago to encourage this type creation, CivicLab. As an example of "civic making" I will discuss Between the Bars, a paper based blogging platform for those who are incarcerated, built in Django. I will also discuss our choice in framework and the pros/cons of our approach.
Measure It
(1:00:00 Minutes)
By: Peter Fein
measure_it provides timing and counting for iterators (and other code segments). https://measure_it.readthedocs.org/en/latest/
Monoids in Python
(0:20:00 Minutes)
By: Philip Doctor
Monoids are largely badly explained, but actually quite beautiful. I would like to take a brief tour of what a monoid is and how they can help out with mundane every day tasks in python.
Python heart Open Source Hardware
(0:05:00 Minutes)
By: Paul Ebreo
Open Source Hardware is going to change the world. But the hardware is still going to need software to control it. Can Python take the lead and become the de facto language of open source hardware control? Paul Ebreo talks about the three keys to Python's success in open hardware.
What happened at #aaronswhack?
(0:02:00 Minutes)
By: Sheila Miguez
Many python programmers showed up to participate in the Chicago #aaronswhack. Here's a list of what they worked on, and here are pointers to local projects as well as worldwide projects.
PyData Recap Lightning Talk
(0:05:00 Minutes)
By: Jason Wirth
Recap of last weeks PyData conference in NYC.
112 Python enthusiasts attended this meeting.

Thursday, December 12 2013 at 07:00 PM at Braintree

A Visual Guide To Pandas
(0:20:00 Minutes)
By: Jason Wirth
Pandas is the data-munging Swiss Army knife of the Python world. Often you know how your data should look but it's not so obvious how to get there, so I'll present a visual approach to learning the library and data manipulation.
The Chicago Process: How Braintree Develops Software
(0:15:00 Minutes)
By: Adam Forsyth
Braintree needs to be highly available and secure, while still maintaining a rapid development pace and strict backwards compatibility. In order to achieve that, we use what has become known as the "Chicago Process". This involves pairing, strict TDD, a team structure, and weekly iterations, all to empower the devs to make decisions and get work of a high quality done while avoiding siloing.
Storm (with python (and a side of clojure))
(0:15:00 Minutes)
By: Philip Doctor
A walking tour of Storm, what it is, what you can do, and how you can use it with python.
59 Python enthusiasts attended this meeting.

Thursday, January 09 2014 at 07:00 PM at Dev Bootcamp

Lexical Graphs with Natural Language Processing using NLTK
(0:45:00 Minutes)
By: Brian Ray
Brian will talk about his experiences using Python and NLTK http://nltk.org/ to run language comparisons to generate lexical difference graphs like the one mentioned in the "Lexical Distance Among the Languages of Europe" article. http://bit.ly/1cS46Ba The focus will be on the NLTK and how its internals work to process a language. This talk will be his best one ever.
Garbage Collection w/ Ref. Cycles
(0:30:00 Minutes)
By: Aaron Brady
Reference counting is very useful but it has an odd problem. We employ a technique from graphs to approach it. The solution works but it's a bit slow.
There were 986 roadway fatalities in Illinois in 2013. Where's the data?
(0:20:00 Minutes)
By: Nick Bennett
Seen on garish LED roadway signs all around Chicago on New Year's Eve, 2013: 986 TRAFFIC DEATHS IN 2013. It leads to many questions: On what roads? When did the accidents happen? What do we do now? I'm scared to drive. I will talk about purging my fears by finding the data to answer some of those questions. http://tothebeat.github.io/fatal-car-crashes/ This talk will involve PythonAnywhere, IPython, a module that's not even on PyPi (dbfpy), searching for and finding open government data, CartoDB, Google Fusion Tables, csv, and maybe Pandas. Rest assured, there will be no graphic photos.
80 Python enthusiasts attended this meeting.

Thursday, February 13 2014 at 07:00 PM at Bank of America Building (Field Building)

Curiosity.com
(0:30:00 Minutes)
By: Christopher Coté
I am Director of Engineering for Discovery Communications Emerging Business and Strategy team. We just relaunched Curiosity.com. We use Python all over the place along with MongoDB/Redis/ElasticSearch The site lives within AWS utilizing several of their services. Including EC2, ELB, Route53, Cloudwatch, S3 I would like to discuss our overall architecture and our use/love of Python. And answer any questions on architecture/scalability/process/code.
119 Python enthusiasts attended this meeting.

Thursday, March 13 2014 at 07:00 PM at Deloitte

Simple Websockets in Flask
(0:20:00 Minutes)
By: Daniel Hodges
Using flask, websockets, and redis to make a simple multi-user drawing surface in D3.
How to teach programming to novices
(0:10:00 Minutes)
By: John Blischak
R for Python Programmers
By: John Blischak
Starting Over From Scratch
(0:25:00 Minutes)
By: Malcolm Newsome
Often developers get too attached to the code that they write.  So much so that we dread losing it.  But, what happens when you intentionally delete code and rewrite it?  You might be surprised at the result.
59 Python enthusiasts attended this meeting.